CIPD Survey – 31% of employers report a rise in ‘presenteeism’

coffee didn't help, still tired. Supporting hands are needed.

Once again the studies carried out by the CIPD have confirmed a trend that has been worrying us here at Extra Dimension for some time. The survey found that 1 in 3 employers have reported an increase in ‘presenteeism’. For those of you not familiar with this term it means staff coming to work when they are ill, either physically or mentally, for example when they are suffering from stress. Unfortunately, this is not a one-off increase; the report also found that the problem of employees coming into work when they are ill has increased every year for the past 5 years.

The CIPD found that presenteeism is more likely to occur in businesses where long working hours are normal and operational demands are high, which is often the case in larger organisations.

In our experience these increases may also be due to the financial climate (or perception of it), where employees feel pressured to deliver in the face of austerity cuts and additionally may be concerned about losing out on pay or even losing their jobs altogether if they fail to attend.
Finally the report confirmed another fact which we have experienced; employers who report an increase in presenteeism find they experience a correlating increase in long-term stress-related absence within their company.

We know that if you want your team members to work well within your business, you need to take the appropriate steps to make sure you are putting employee wellbeing above, or at least on a par with, the operational demands of your business. When an employee comes into work sick, they won’t be working to the same productivity levels as they would be if they were in good health. This can have a knock on effect to other staff and impact on customer service and perceptions of your business.

Despite these findings, over half the organisations that have experienced an increase in presenteeism haven’t taken any steps to discourage it.

So, what can be done to prevent it?

  • Identify the root cause of the presenteeism. A lack of motivation often correlates with stress and absence
  • Develop employee wellbeing strategies (this does not mean a corporate gym membership)
  • Investigate individual’s key motivators and invest in improving communication and quality of leadership
  • Give your team access to good employee support
  • Promote health and wellbeing in the workplace, and train your leaders to recognise the signs of stress or ill health
  • Put an emphasis on giving managers the skills they need to manage people in a way that gets the best out of them, whilst supporting their wellbeing.

    A Team Motivation Review from Extra Dimension can identify the causes of presenteeism in your team and give you and your managers the skills to prevent it. Get in touch with us today to find out more.

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December 10, 2015 at 8:29 am Leave a comment

Top 10 reasons your employees might be unhappy with their careers

A scissor is cuting happy from unhappy on the desk.

A recent CIPD/Halogen Employee Outlook survey has found that 33% of employees say their careers have failed to live up to their aspirations.  You might not think this applies to your team, but how would you know for sure?

This statistic has potential links to one of our previous blogs, ‘Retaining your talent will be harder in 2015, up to 37% of them could be planning to leave’.  Taken together they could explain why the recruitment market is starting to pick up again, and why it is more important than ever to have pro-active employee retention plans in place.

In our March blog we explained what you can do to retain your top talent, but this month we’ll focus on why your employees might be disappointed with their job, and how it is in your power to help them.

How many of our list of the top 10 reasons why employees are unhappy could apply to your team members?

1.    I don’t know exactly what is expected of me at work
2.    I don’t have the resources I need to achieve what is expected of me
3.    My responsibilities do not match my skill set
4.    I don’t feel appreciated for my good work
5.    My manager does not care about me as a person
6.    I don’t feel like I’m doing anything worthwhile
7.    No one listens to my opinions
8.    I do not feel my job is contributing to the success of the company
9.    In the last six months, no one has talked to me about my career progression
10.    I am not given any independence, everything I do is controlled by my manager

You don’t need to be the smartest person in the world to spot that many of the reasons for employee dissatisfaction listed above can be resolved through good communication.  Communication is one of the most critical aspects of leadership – without it, staff, teams, departments and eventually whole companies can fail.

Of course not all of the reasons listed above will apply to all employees and different people will be motivated by different aspects of their job.  If you can understand what motivates your team members, and whether those motivators are satisfied by their role, you can understand the areas in which changes are needed.

The team’s Motivation Profile enables you to tailor your communication, rewards and strategies by engaging with their non-financial drivers.  When you talk to individuals you can focus even more on their motivators.

If you think a Motivation Review could help your staff find career satisfaction get in touch today.

September 7, 2015 at 9:19 am Leave a comment

I’ve promoted my best salesperson to leader of the sales team, but it’s not working out, why?

When looking for a new sales leader, many companies look for candidates among their existing sales team and select their best salesperson for the managerial role. They assume that because an individual is good at sales, they will be successful in the management of a sales team too. Of course, they may be right and a great many successful salespeople do become successful managers. However this is not always the case.

Salespeople are successful when they meet the customer’s needs whilst also achieving the company’s financial goals. A successful salesperson is driven and persistent with eagerness and willingness to seize opportunities. They do, however, require fuel to keep them working at their highest level. This fuel is motivation and it exists in many forms, often tied to incentives and rewards for a job well done.

Sales managers also succeed by meeting customer needs and achieving objectives, but they are neither the hunter nor the centre of the action. Managers contribute to customer and company success when their team of people is successful. A lacklustre sales force benefits from a manager that sets a firm example of hard work. Even productive sales people need a manager that encourages them to strive further and give credit when it’s due. Managers have the opportunity to increase sales productivity and job performance, all while maintaining a positive and stress-free work environment.

Of course any new manager will require training in their new role and coaching to develop their skills, so whether you have promoted from within or recruited from elsewhere, you must ensure you are giving them that.

Managers are coaches; they need to be able to get satisfaction from achieving objectives through others. However when a salesperson gets promoted to manager, it’s no longer about them, it’s about the team. Unless you select a sales person who is able to cope with this change and who has the characteristics it takes to do the next job well, not just those who have demonstrated success in their current job, your sales management team will be average at best.

June 9, 2015 at 1:25 pm Leave a comment

Retaining Your Talent Will Be Harder In 2015

A recent survey by the Institute of Leadership and Management (ILM) has found that 37% of UK workers are planning to leave their jobs in 2015 – that’s almost double the figure at this time last year.  When salary increases have been suppressed for a number of years and now the job market is picking up, employers should not be surprised by this statistic. But are you ready?  Do you have tip-top retention plans for your tip-top talent?

A talented team is your most valuable and profitable asset. Happy and engaged employees are often the most motivated to contribute to the company’s business objectives. Losing a good employee has huge cost implications, as well as negatively affecting morale.  It can also have an impact on the skill level of your team so you need to do what you can to hold on to your employees.

Encourage Career Development

The ILM survey goes on to identify the reasons for wanting to move.  Although a salary increase is high, at number 2, the top reason is for career progression.   Even small changes, such as delegating tasks within the work place, are a fantastic way to help people to develop and reach their potential.  For example, assigning a high performing team member a task that might be out of their comfort zone gives them the opportunity to learn something new and feel that they’re trusted to contribute to the business in different ways. When used correctly, delegation is a great tool, which can help top talent to visualise the possibilities within the business they work.  With your support, taking on more responsibility will naturally lead them towards opportunities to progress.

Understand What Makes Them Tick

Around half of those surveyed said they would move for a ‘more interesting role’.  These people are motivated by the mental stimulation and challenge within a role, so they don’t want to be doing the same things day in day out.  I would suggest that, as a leader, you probably don’t want them doing that either, so take a look at the role and see how it can be developed to suit the individual and meet business needs.  Small changes can make a big difference, such as giving someone a project in a new area which helps drive the business in a different direction.

Work-Life Balance

Around a third of those surveyed want to spend more time doing things they enjoy away from the workplace.  This means when they are at work they will have more energy and enthusiasm for it.  Are you one of those leaders who measure success by how many hours people work or do you create a positive environment that invests in their well-being, both professionally and personally?  There are many small things that can contribute here, such as flexible work hours or gym memberships.

Better Management

A similar number of respondents said they would move for better management, and to be valued more in their role.   It is essential that leaders acknowledge people for a job well done on a consistent basis.  For those who like public praise, make sure the wider business sees what their contribution has meant.  Consider having an ‘employee of the month’ scheme (voted by the employees).  Open praise has a powerful impact on both motivation and staff retention.

The loss of top performers can have a devastating impact on teams, companies and customers. Thinking about retaining your top talent when someone has given you his or her resignation means that you’ve left it too late – they have already taken the emotional decision to leave. Managing talent is key, as is checking in on how the whole of your team is feeling about their day-to-day role so that you can intervene and improve things early on.

Staff retention and business success go hand in hand and it is an ongoing process that brings untold benefits to both your business and your customers.

If you need help identifying the motivators of your top talent get in touch and book your Team Motivation review today.

March 4, 2015 at 1:11 pm Leave a comment

Times are tough and I’m not sure if I can afford big bonuses for my staff this year? Is there any other way to ensure they stay?

Many managers believe that the only way to motivate their employees is with money, bonuses, salary increases, overtime or increased benefits. Of course, good managers want their employees to have the best that the company can possibly offer. In spite of that, sometimes their just isn’t the money to provide these perks and you may be at loss as to what you should do instead to motivate your employees. There are, however, things you can do to keep your staff focused and happy.

1 – Be a good communicator

You cannot be a good leader without being an effective communicator. This means the ability to both communicate with your staff and also listen to their ideas and at times concerns. The most effective leaders are the ones who take the time to listen not just to their team members’ words but also the meanings beneath what is being said. Communicate to them that your door is always open should they need to discuss anything with you. As the people on the front lines, they often have a lot of valuable information to share and important questions and concerns that you need to address.

2 – Energise your team

Instead of being a manager who sucks energy away from your team you need to be a manager who motivates and brings passion and positive energy to your team. Your employees need to feel that they are appreciated and that their hard work is noticed. Without this you will have team lacking in energy and unwilling to work towards the best possible outcomes for both you and the business.

3 – Recognition

No matter how impressive your employees are and how dedicated to the business they are, everyone still needs a healthy dose of appreciation to keep them going. It may sounds like a simple thing but never forget to tell your employees, as often and in as many ways as possible, that your business could never accomplish all it does without their help. Your recognition is appreciation for their achievements and most managers do not do this enough. Recognition is free so become a manager who does this, look at the benefits for your business, they can only be positive.

4 – Training

Many managers feel like their staff are already trained enough or that their staff are already good enough and don’t need to be trained. However, this is not the way to motivate your staff or develop your business. There is no thing as too much training.  I know this takes time, but group-training sessions focused on specific areas will continually enhance the performance of your staff and the productivity of your business. As well as this you can also offer your employees one-on-one coaching.  One-on-one development means you care and employees won’t know how much until they see your willingness to develop their personal and business potential.

5 – Progression

Your employees need to know what is potentially ahead for them, what opportunities there are for growth. This is an important issue in the overall motivation of people. Set career paths and opportunities for the staff within your business. Although specific circumstances require you to look for talent outside your company you should always first consider internal personnel. If you do this you are sending a very positive message to every one that there are indeed further career opportunities within your company.

While it may seem that cash incentives are the only way to motivate your staff and keep them working to the highest of their potential, non-cash motivators may be more effective in the long term.

January 8, 2015 at 11:00 am Leave a comment

What to do when the big boss changes the rules?

Within large corporations, senior managers can often find themselves caught between the decisions made by the board and how to get the best from their team in times of change. The responsibility for keeping their team happy and motivated whilst implementing to the ideas from above can leave any leader feeling somewhat isolated, with no obvious support mechanism.

For example, your Managing Director decides to change the way the sales team operates by reducing the number of accounts that each salesperson will focus on. You understand completely that this increased focus by your team should drive better results. However you know that your sales teams will feel constrained because they will see less opportunity for them to succeed. What should you do?

Firstly, be very clear about your views on the changes.  If you support the changes then you are more likely to communicate them in a positive way to the team. If you can’t see anything positive then speak to your boss to raise your concerns, and to get more information to be able to move into a positive mindset. This is vital if you are to be successful in convincing the team to adopt the new approach.

Next, pre-empt who will be impacted the most be these changes and establish what options you have to minimise that impact.

Once you have communicated the changes, listen to what your team is saying and if they have any concerns. Remember that listening is not just about being quiet and hearing what the person is saying. Give the person your full attention and be aware of both their facial expressions and body language, all of which can tell you a lot about how a person is feeling. Leaders who are able to really listen to their team create trustworthy and loyal relationships and make their team feel that they have their best interests at heart.

Understand your team’s concerns. Take the time to put yourself in their shoes, especially if they have a genuine complaint about the changes that are taking place. Sometimes people are scared to try something new and this is where your leadership skills come in. You must try and understand their worries while also encouraging them and showing them that the tasks are possible.  As the team leader you must also understand why the Managing Director has made the changes. For example, are they trying to focus the team, so their efforts are more productive, but the team feels their ‘sales creativity’ is being limited?

Discuss the team’s ideas with them. Listen to what they suggest. If you feel that your team are justified in their concerns then you may need to go back to the Managing Director to discuss this further. However, if you feel that these changes can be worked through then explain the changes to your team in more detail. Show your team you are flexible and willing to consider their thoughts.

Lastly, be positive. If the change is permanent then find a way to talk to your team about it in a positive way.  A demoralised team won’t function. As the team leader you must make this change a positive thing, make the goals clear, show how the job is feasible and possible, show them the positive results of this work. No one will work for an impossible goal.

October 23, 2014 at 11:18 am Leave a comment

I feel constantly over-worked. How can I get my life back without letting my team down?

Being a manager can be extremely challenging and stressful. It can require you to work long hours while constantly trying to whittle down your list of overwhelming tasks and prioritise other responsibilities, but it doesn’t have to be that way. With just a few simple steps you can have the work/life balance you have been yearning for without feeling like you are letting anyone down.

To get the right work/life balance, begin with prioritising. You don’t have to spend an equal amount of time on each, but make sure that the balance you choose is equal in importance. Sometimes work will take priority and you may need to spend extra hours working on an important project while at other times personal matters will be more pressing. Without this balance you will be less productive, stressed both at work and at home and the feeling of being overwhelmed will only increase.

Secondly, learn to manage your time. Set yourself realistic goals for the hours that you have available in your day and remember to allow yourself some extra time just in case there is a work based emergency. Make sure that you list all the jobs that you must accomplish each day and that the top priority tasks are listed first. Use calendars, to-do lists or anything else that will help you to plan your time more effectively.

Thirdly, delegate, as this will free up your time. Delegate entire objectives to other employees, giving the responsibility for the performance and the outcome to the employee. You can make sure that they know your expectations and you can also check the outcome, but you must leave the rest to them. Use a simple dashboard / traffic light system to monitor everything you have delegated. This allows you to focus on your own activities rather than worrying about what others are doing. Not only will this boost the moral of your team, but being able to delegate in this way will mean that your workload, as well as your stress levels, will be drastically reduced.

Finally, stress can affect your health, your relationships and your ability to perform in your job. Use some basic techniques to reduce stress, like getting enough sleep, exercising or even meditation. All are excellent ways to help reduce your stress levels and ensure you are performing to the best of your ability.

If you would like more help with balancing your workload and working effectively with your team get in touch with me today for a free consultation

August 20, 2014 at 3:36 pm Leave a comment

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Alan Adair

Contact Details

Alan Adair

Extra Dimension
Helping you and your teams to be more engaged, motivated and effective.

21 Pelican House
Stone Close
Poole
BH15 4GE

Tel 01202 830047

Email alan.adair@extradimension.co.uk

Website
www.extradimension.co.uk

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